Take 5 For Safety – When You Least Expect It

 


When You Least Expect It

The prospect of getting into an accident is something no one likes to think about. Time and again we hear our managers, supervisors or co-workers telling us to be careful, work safely and use personal protective equipment. Yet, do we really listen? We hear the words, but do we really believe we’ll be the one who will have an accident?

There are those who take the safety message at work seriously, and those who do not. Safe work procedures have a purpose. Experience tells us that if we do things right, we’ll complete our work correctly and safely. When personal protective equipment (PPE) is provided, this is also for good reason. PPE prevents or minimizes injury or illness to the user.

Sometimes accidents happen when you least expect them. The following true stories prove this, along with a reminder that sometimes they do happen to us….

Lesson #1: Two mechanics were working on a step van and repairing the rear roll-up door. In order to fix the door, they had to alternately “tension” the large spring that assists the door’s upward movement. As they took turns tightening the spring by inserting 3/8 inch metal rods into the spring catches, the front mechanic’s rod slipped out from the catch. The rebound motion and force made the rod, still in his hand, fly back and strike the other mechanic in the eye. Obviously, the mechanic who was struck in the eye needed immediate emergency medical attention.

Lesson? Lack of eye protection + inadequate work procedures = serious injury.

Lesson #2: A construction superintendent was observing project operations when a piece of heavy equipment ran over a piece of concrete with its’ rear tire. The object became a flying projectile when it “shot out” from under the tire, missed a small stock pile, sailed past a back-hoe and struck the superintendent in the head. Fortunately, the superintendent was wearing his hard hat, or the blow might easily have been fatal.

Lesson? Use of PPE = protection from more serious injury or death.

Lesson #3: An employee was using a bench grinder to polish a piece of metal on the wire wheel. When he turned to talk to another employee, and took his eyes off his work, the piece of metal he was holding became caught between the wheel and the tool rest. His finger was pulled into the wire wheel which instantly shaved off part of his finger.

Lesson? Lack of concentration + improperly adjusted tool rest = painful injury.

Work should not have to be a death or injury experience. Unfortunately, lack of caution and attention can make it one. The next time you hear someone say, “be careful,” take a minute to really listen to the message and ask yourself, “Why should I be careful?” The answer is, “because accidents happen when you least expect them-and sometimes they happen to you.”

Think about yourself, family, friends and co-workers-don’t learn a lesson the hard way!

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Take 5 For Safety – Review of the Hazard Communication Standard

 


Review of the Hazard Communication Standard 

The purpose of a Hazard Communication Program is to help employees understand the potential hazards of the chemicals in use at their worksite. This education, required by the Occupational Safety & Health Act, is also called Workers’ Right To Know. Failure to meet all the requirements of the law is OSHA’s most frequently cited violation. One of the reasons for this is, many employers, supervisors and workers think chemicals are just too complex to explain and to understand. As a result, there is a temptation to avoid the subject.
Hazard Communication is very important, however, because it can protect employees from dangers that may be present when chemicals are being used. One very important key to a Hazard Communication Program is the Safety Data Sheet. These sheets tell you “everything you need to know” about a specific chemical. If you read the SDS you will be able to determine:

  • The HEALTH HAZARDS associated with any chemical you are using or are exposed to;
  • How FLAMMABLE the product is, and at what temperature it may ignite;
  • The REACTIVITY of the chemical with water or other agents-will it explode, etc.?
  • What PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT (PPE) is needed to work with the product.

Every employee should be able to answer, and should remember, the following questions:

  • Where are the  SDS’s kept for the chemicals I am exposed to?
  • What kinds of hazards do I face when I use-or misuse–this chemical?
  • Do I understand the emergency procedures to follow in the event of a spill?
  • Have I inspected my personal protective equipment to be sure that it will protect me properly when and if I need to use it?

A convenient tool for reviewing the hazards and control of chemicals in your operation is an SDS Information Review form. Critical information can be transferred to this form and most people find it more “user friendly” than the full Safety Data Sheet. The complete SDS can be reviewed when more specific details are needed, and should always be available.
Chemistry is a complex subject, and it’s hard to understand everything about the dozens-sometimes hundreds-of chemicals being used at work. Maybe the best way to accomplish this is to recall the question, “How do you eat an elephant?” The answer is, “One bite at a time!”
If one or two SDS’s are reviewed at regular safety meetings, using an SDS Information Review form, everyone will soon better understand the chemicals they work with, and know how to protect themselves from injury or illness.
 

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Take 5 For Safety – A Single Second

 


A Single Second

  • It takes a minute to write a safety rule.
  • It takes an hour to hold a safety meeting.
  • It takes a week to plan a good safety program.
  • It takes a month to put that program into operation.
  • It takes a year to win a safety award.
  • It takes a lifetime to make a safe worker.
  • But it takes only a second to destroy it all – with one accident. A Positive Attitude
    Humans instinctively seek to avoid pain and death. And yet, we may behave in a manner that is a threat to our well-being. There are a couple of reasons why this occurs. The first is lack of knowledge. What you do not know, can hurt you!. The second reason we may act in a risky manner is attitude. Now might be a good time to do a quick self-analysis. What is your attitude toward safety?
    When asked, some may say they are all for it. Others may complain about any safety effort being made. The difference between the two is one of attitude. Your attitude affects almost all that you do and how you do it.
    Have you ever noticed that people who are successful in life, or are just happy, tend to have a positive attitude? And so it is with safety. Look at it this way. . . safety rules and procedures are written to protect you from harm. They are not written to make your work life more uncomfortable or inconvenient. After all, safety equipment and training costs your employer additional up front money.

If you cooperate in safety matters, not only is there a lesser likelihood of you getting hurt, you will not be doing battle with the boss who is just trying to do his job by enforcing the safety rules. In addition, you should feel more confident on the job knowing you have a better chance of making it thorough the day without injury. Less fear of injury and the boss no longer on your back has to brighten your day!
 

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Take 5 For Safety – Machine Safety – Requirements For Safeguards

 


Machine Safety – Requirements For Safeguards

Placing and keeping guards on exposed machinery is a major step in preventing lacerations and amputations of body parts. It is also a requirement of State or federal OSHA Safety and Health Standards. In general, these standards explain guarding requirements in the following terms:

  • Machines which have a grinding, shearing, punching, pressing, squeezing, drawing, cutting, rolling, mixing or similar action, including pinch points and shear points, whereas an employee comes within the danger zone, shall be guarded at the point of operation in a manner that provides protection for the employee.
  • Keys, set screws, projections or recesses which create a hazard not guarded by the frame of the machine or by location shall be removed, made flush or guarded.

Some people consider such guards a nuisance. Others consider them as a necessary evil. But how evil can they be if they help save precious fingers, hands and arms from injury or serious mutilation? In general, guards should have the following characteristics:

  1. They Should Prevent Contact: The safeguard must prevent hands, arms, or any other part of a worker’s body from making contact with dangerous moving parts. A guard should not only prevent accidental contact but should prevent workers from intentionally going around or bypassing the guard.
  2. They Should Be Secure: If the guard is easily removable, this means it will be ineffective. The guards should be of durable material and most should be bolted or screwed on so that they require tools for removal.
  3. They Should Create No New Hazards: The guard itself should not create a new hazard. For example, sharp or jagged edges could cause lacerations. The guards should be affixed in a manner that eliminates sharp edges.
  4.  
  5. They Should Create No Interference: A good guard should allow the employee to work comfortably and efficiently–since otherwise it may be removed.
  6. They Should Allow Safe Maintenance: If possible, guards should be designed so as to allow minor maintenance on the machines without either removing the safeguards or being exposed to the hazard. If the guard must be removed or deactivated, then lock-out procedures should be followed before any maintenance is performed.

Don’t be another OSHA statistic–an employee who lost a finger, hand or an arm. Remember to always maintain the guards on the machines and to replace them if they must be removed for maintenance.

Have You Checked All The Guards On Your Machinery and Equipment Lately?

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Maalt Safety Moment – No U Turns


Subject: Maalt Safety Moment – No U-Turns

No U Turns.  Please remember that we have a “No U Turn†Policy.  If you miss your turn, please find a safe and legal place to turn around to get back on the correct route.  One of the sand carriers missed a turn this morning and ruptured a fuel tank, spilling a large amount of diesel fuel on approximately a one mile stretch of roadway including the lease road.  Have a Great Day! 

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Maalt Safety Moment – Tire Pressure and Road Safety


Subject: Maalt Safety Moment – Tire Pressure and Road Safety

Tire Pressure and Road Safety.  Tires are the second highest cost of maintaining a fleet after fuel costs.  Proper tire pressure helps prevent premature wear, helps to maintain proper fuel economy, and makes for a better day.  Have you ever had to sit alongside the road and wait for a roadside tire repair?  Could it have been prevented?  It is recommended that steer tires are 120 PSI and all other tires 100-105 PSI when cold.  Please help us help you have a better day on the road, Have a Great Day! 

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Maalt Safety Moment – Entering and Exiting your Vehicle


Subject: Maalt Safety Moment – Entering and Exiting your Vehicle

Entering and Exiting your vehicle.  Please remember to use three points of contact while entering and exiting your vehicle as this will help limit your risk of injury from a fall.  Please also be aware of your surroundings while performing this task as most job sites are not flat level surfaces.  Have a Great Day!

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Maalt Safety Moment – Tractor 5th Wheel and You!


Subject: Maalt Safety Moment – Tractor 5th Wheel and You!

Tractor 5th Wheel and You!  Please inspect your 5th wheel daily as part of your pre-trip and also disconnect and grease them on a weekly basis.  Our terminals are equipped with grease packets.  Keeping your 5th wheel greased will prevent premature steer tire wear and also make it easier to maintain control of your equipment while on the road.  Have a Great Day! 

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Maalt Safety Moment – Pre-Trip Inspections


Subject: Maalt Safety Moment – Pre-Trip Inspection

Pre-Trip Inspection.  Please remember to check for audible air leaks during your pre-trip inspection.  One way to do this is by allowing your air compressor to fill the tanks, then shut off the vehicle, exit vehicle and walk around listening for air leaks.  It is easy to overlook an air leak while the vehicle is running.  The most common place for a DOT Inspector to locate an air leak is at the glad hand connections on a combination vehicle.  Remember to also complete your 7 Point brake check prior to leaving the yard.  Have a Great Day!

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Maalt Safety Moment – Well Site Etiquette


Subject: Maalt Safety Moment – Well Site Etiquette

Well Site Etiquette.  Please remember to always be professional on the wellsite, for that matter be Professional all the time, this includes CB Radio talk during the workday.  Our customers along with other third parties monitor the CB for truck traffic.  Have a Great Day!     

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