Take 5 For Safety – Watch Your Step!! Don’t Slip & Fall

 


Watch Your Step!! Don’t Slip & Fall

Slips and falls are one of the most frequent causes of accidents, both on and off the job. Each year in the United States, more than 300,000 people suffer disabling injuries from falls. Slips and falls can be fatal as well; they rank second only to automobile accidents, causing nearly 12,000 deaths a year. To avoid getting hurt from falls, avoid rushing and remember the following:

WATCH WHERE YOU WALK

Be aware of where you are walking. Look down continuously for spilled liquids, materials, equipment, changing surface levels, etc. Make sure the area is well-lit or use a flashlight if lighting is poor.

WEAR PROPER FOOTWEAR

Make sure your shoes are in good shape and correct for the job. Discard worn-out shoes with smooth soles and other defects. If conditions are wet and slippery, wear non-slip shoes or boots. Avoid footwear with leather soles which have poor floor traction–especially on smooth surfaces.

CHECK FLOOR OPENINGS

Avoid unguarded floor openings. On construction sites, when covers are placed over floor openings, avoid walking on the cover unless it is absolutely secure and will not move or collapse. Never jump over pits or other openings.

BE CAREFUL ON STAIRS

Do not run when going up or down stairs. Check to see that stair treads are in good shape, with no obstructions on the steps. Always use the hand railings that are provided. Avoid carrying large loads when going up or down stairs and ensure that stairs are well-lit.

USE LADDERS CORRECTLY

Never use broken or defective ladders. Set the angle of the ladder at the proper four-to-one ratio (height to width angle). Make sure the ladder is on solid footing and will not move when you climb upon it. Whenever possible, tie your ladder to the structure to improve stability. Anchorage at the bottom is also a good idea. Never stand on the top two steps of a step ladder.

MAKE SURE SCAFFOLDING IS SAFE TO USE

When working on scaffolding, make sure it is secure, stable and properly set-up. Do not work on scaffolding if guard rails are missing or the base is unstable. Check to see that planks are in good shape and not cracked. Tall scaffolds should be tied into a structure to increase stability.

DON’T JUMP OUT OF VEHICLES

Never jump from equipment or vehicles. Use the handrail and steps provided, remembering the “three point rule.” Avoid stepping onto loose rocks, slippery surfaces, oil spills, etc.

Watch your step and don’t trip yourself up! Remember, Gravity Always Wins!

Facebook
Facebook


Website
Website



Copyright © , All rights reserved.

 


This email was sent to

Take 5 For Safety – General Safety – Safe Attitudes

 


General Safety – Safe Attitudes

I was in a shipyard when I observed a worker perched precariously high and above the ground on a structural member. The Safety Manager signed time out and said, “Let’s talk about this.” The worker replied angrily, “Are we here to play safety or to build ships?” Fortunately for everyone, including himself, this employee was soon gone. Think about this man’s attitude toward safety. We probably agree that his outlook was negative. Negative attitudes toward safety lead to negative results — accidents. Experience has shown us that all the safety training and equipment in the world cannot ensure safety without the proper safety attitude also being present. Is your attitude toward safety positive, or negative? Is safety part of your job or is it an obstacle someone has put in your way to make your job more difficult?
Hopefully, you will accept the fact that safety is part of your job. If you can accept that fact, not only will you increase your chances of going home uninjured at the end of the day, you may also find that your life at work becomes a bit more pleasant. How so?
Enforcing safety rules is part of your supervisor’s job. If you violate safety rules, the supervisor must correct you. This can lead to resentment. You have to understand that giving someone a break when they ignore safety rules actually encourages further breaking of the rules and can set up a situation leading to an accident and injury. If you do not have a safe attitude, then it becomes the supervisor’s job to change your behavior. Generally, this involves some sort of discipline, something no one likes to do or to receive. You can avoid this unpleasantness by simply following the rules and changing your attitude yourself. Remember, although your employer may have a legal obligation to make and enforce the rules, they are made to protect you.
You are the primary beneficiary.

Facebook
Facebook


Website
Website



Copyright © , All rights reserved.

 


This email was sent to

Take 5 For Safety – What to do About “Near Misses”

 


What to do About “Near Misses”

 

Unlike a western gunfight “shoot out” at the corral on television, serious accidents can cause real anguish and suffering so real and vivid that persons involved or nearby bystanders rarely forget the flow of blood, broken limbs, crushed bodies, or screams of pain. An accident without injury though is more like the bloodless, painless fakery of television “violence”-perhaps without real purpose in the drama, and therefore easy to forget.

In real life there is a danger in brushing off accidents that do not hurt, harm, or damage. When these accidents, or perhaps we should refer to them as near misses, happen we should immediately run the red warning flag up the pole. Because a non-injury accident is like a 104 degree fever, it’s a positive sign or symptom that something is wrong.

Sometimes we misdiagnose or completely fail to diagnose the symptoms of near misses, because luck or blind chance saved us from injury. We may tend to shrug it off and forget the near miss with a casual kind of ignorance. Hopefully everyone agrees that it is not a good practice to rely on luck for effective accident prevention.

One of the best ways to eliminate the likelihood of future close calls is through effective root cause analysis and effective corrective action taken on near misses. A list of near misses can be almost endless: lack of proper machine guarding; improper maintenance or grounding of equipment; missing handrails or guardrails; poor housekeeping; improperly stored material; stubbing a toe on a protruding floor object; bumping up against a sharp object; or tripping over clutter and almost falling down. It’s best to learn the real lessons from these near misses, since they are very likely to continue to occur repeatedly until an injury occurs.

There was a study done many years ago that found for every serious or disabling injury reported, there were about 10 injuries of a less serious nature, 30 property damage incidents, and about 600 incidents (near misses) with no visible injury or property damage. This study was part of the foundation for the widely accepted accident prevention theory that “increased frequency leads to severity.”

How can you help? Report each and every near miss incident to your supervisor immediately in order to help prompt investigation and follow up actions that will reduce the potential for future near misses. Supervisors must partially rely upon you and your fellow workers to report these to them as they just can’t see everything.

If you are involved with or witness a near miss incident, remember that you or your co-worker may not get a second injury free chance to hoist that red warning flag up the pole. Do your part to help make the workplace safe for everyone involved.

Report those near misses to your supervisor immediately!

Facebook
Facebook


Website
Website



Copyright © , All rights reserved.

 


This email was sent to

Take 5 For Safety – The Silent Sickness – CO Poisoning

 


The Silent Sickness – CO Poisoning

It’s called the “silent sickness,” and sometimes it becomes a “silent killer. Carbon monoxide (CO) is a common gas that can kill in minutes, in high concentrations. Unlike many other chemicals, carbon monoxide has no distinctive odor, taste, or appearance. Unfortunately, the symptoms of CO poisoning-nausea, headache, and dizziness-resemble other common illnesses, and can be easily mistaken for a cold or stomach flu.

How It Poisons: This gas produces its toxic effects when you breathe it, by replacing oxygen in the blood stream with carbon monoxide which acts on all organs in the body, especially the brain. As carbon monoxide combines with hemoglobin, less and less oxygen is carried to the tissues. Unconsciousness usually occurs when about half the hemoglobin is saturated with CO.

How It’s Produced: Any process that involves the use of heat, oxidation, or combustion can produce carbon monoxide. Winter months can be a dangerous time for this problem. Buildings are tightly closed, and the buildup of the gas is not usually noticed by unsuspecting employees. This dangerous gas can be a problem in buildings, repair shops, and temporary weather enclosures as well as car and truck cabs if exhaust systems are malfunctioning or leaking.

High Exposure Areas: The gasoline engines used around shipping docks are known carbon monoxide producers. Diesel engines are next in level of danger, followed by propane-powered forklift trucks. Employees must be particularly careful if forklifts are left running inside a truck or trailer body; hazardous CO concentrations can build up very quickly. Watch outside delivery truck drivers too as they are frequently reluctant to shut off truck engines while unloading.

High exposures may occur in forklift or vehicle repair shops. Shipping offices above loading and shipping docks are also vulnerable as the gas rises, causing dizziness and nausea for employees working there. In shop areas, ventilation systems should be checked periodically to prevent poisoning from this gas. Fans should be on, motors and fan belts functioning properly. Hoses and duct work should be carefully connected and the systems checked for dents and holes which could impede the exhaust of gasses. Engines should be turned off as much as possible when buildings are tightly sealed during the winter.

Symptoms of CO Exposure: Symptoms to be alert for include red eyes, weakness, dizziness, headaches, and nausea. If you notice a pattern to these symptoms when engines are running in the area, carbon monoxide could be the cause. Forklifts, whether diesel, propane, or gasoline powered are significant CO producers, especially when left idling. Immediately remove anyone who is overcome from the CO exposure area. Restore breathing through CPR. Keep the person warm and resting until paramedics arrive. If a rescue is required, supplied-air respirators-NOT air-purifyingrespirators-must be used.

Possible Dangers At Home Too: Be alert for symptoms of CO exposure that may be mistaken for the flu. Check for faulty heating systems or chimneys blocked by birds’ nests or soot accumulation. Unvented gas room heaters or portable kerosene heaters should only be used in well ventilated areas. Never use a charcoal cooker indoors during a power outage. Keep your car tuned and check exhaust systems periodically. Do not warm up cars in a closed garage; an idling car’s exhaust in an airtight, two-car garage can overcome a person in one minute. Finally, to protect your family, consider purchasing one of the new CO detectors that are now on the market.

Facebook
Facebook


Website
Website



Copyright © , All rights reserved.

 


This email was sent to

Take 5 For Safety – Over the Counter Medications

 


Over the Counter Medications

Flu, cold, or allergy symptoms such as watery eyes, runny nose, coughing, or a general achy feeling, can incapacitate some people to the point that they must stay home to recover. Others push on because they have deadlines to meet, no sick pay, or feel the company will fall apart without them. These people very likely take whatever over-the-counter medicines they feel are necessary to alleviate the discomfort of their symptoms. The typical “cold medications” are antihistamines or decongestants or a combination of both. Unfortunately, the side effects of these drugs can be dangerous depending on the use and dosage. Many non-prescription drugs cause drowsiness, inattentiveness, or impair one’s ability to concentrate or make decisions, drive a car, operate machinery, and can slow down your reflexes to some degree.

If you really can’t stay home when you are sick, and must take over-the-counter medications, keep these rules in mind:

Follow recommended dosages: Twice the dosage won’t make you feel twice as good but will make you more drowsy and less able to concentrate. Contrary to popular belief, doubling the dose does not double the relief. Doubling the dosage markedly increases the potential side effects without making a big difference in the symptoms you are trying to alleviate. The dosage on the package is effective and should be followed.

Don’t use combination medicines: If you need a decongestant, take a decongestant. If an antihistamine is needed, take one, but avoid multi-ingredient products.

Don’t mix over-the-counter medications or use along with prescription drugs: The side effects of mixing different medications can be severe and are often unpredictable. Individuals who are already on prescription medication should check with their doctor or pharmacist before mixing prescription and over-the-counter medications.

Read the label: Many over-the-counter medicines have warnings about such things as operating machinery, driving, and drinking alcohol when taking the medication. Believe the label warnings as they are there for one reason, your safety. Ignoring these warnings can make the effects of over-the-counter drugs even more pronounced, and potentially dangerous.

Find something that works and stick with it: Don’t change remedies every few days. Side effects usually diminish after a week or so of use. Try new medications over the weekend, so if side effects do occur, they won’t jeopardize your safety.

Don’t underestimate the dangers that over-the-counter medications can cause to your safety.
Consult your physician if you questions or if adverse symptoms persist.

Facebook
Facebook


Website
Website



Copyright © , All rights reserved.

 


This email was sent to

Take 5 For Safety – Practice Good Knife Safety

 


Practice Good Knife Safety

There is a story about a young boy who visited a traveling circus with a carnival sideshow. At one of the sideshow tents a barker pitched, “For a mere dollar, one of the great truths of life will be revealed!” This intrigued the boy, so he forked over his dollar and proceeded inside to learn this “Great Truth.”

Inside a tent was an old man sitting on a stool under a dimly lit light bulb, whittling on a stick. The old man repeated over and over again, “Always Cut Away From You and You’ll Never Cut Yourself.” At this point, the young man felt betrayed and figured he had been cheated. This was the great truth?? As a matter of fact, the advice was quite valuable to him throughout his life, because he never forgot it.

Frequently we have a need to use knives and other cutting tools in our jobs, as well as at home. We cut bindings off boxes of paper. We cut seafood, meat or poultry. We open containers of all sorts. We cut ropes, cloth and various materials and adapt them to our use. But we don’t always do this safely.

Watch someone use a knife sometime and notice how often they risk being injured by cutting toward their body parts. You might see individuals hold a loaf of bread near their chest and cut toward themselves when slicing off a chunk. Sometimes when cutting a rope, we bend the rope into a loop and insert the knife into the loop facing upward. When the knife is drawn up through the rope, the force of the cutting action can bring it to the face or other body parts. This is not a good idea!

An unwise but common use of box knives is to reach across the box and draw the knife toward you. This is foolish. As the old man said, “Always Cut Away From You and You’ll Never Cut Yourself!”

Another great truth which the old man didn’t reveal is, “A Sharp Knife is a Safer Knife!” It takes less force to cut through an object with a sharp knife. This gives you greater control of the blade. When heavy force is applied, the blade often cuts deeper than intended–sometimes into your flesh. When someone tells you their knife is so dull it wouldn’t cut hot butter, don’t you wonder why they are still using it?

Hand and arm protection is also available for occupations that require the use of knives. Specialty gloves protect hands and arms from cuts and punctures. Smart workers wear this protection consistently.

The bottom line is to practice good Knife Safety.

  • Sharpen it or get rid of it!
  • Use the right knife for the job.
  • Wear cut-resistant gloves when appropriate.
  • Always cut away from you, and you’ll never cut yourself!

Facebook
Facebook


Website
Website



Copyright © , All rights reserved.

 


This email was sent to

Take 5 For Safety – General Safety – Repeaters

 


General Safety – Repeaters

How many times have you been hurt at work, or even at home for that matter? How about the person next to you doing the same job? Are you hurt more often than your co-workers? If so, why?

Some individuals might say they are “accident prone”. But it is not that simple. Your tendency to have accidents is nothing more than the outcome of more specific problems. As an example, are you frequently tripping over items on the floor? Is that a sign of you being “accident prone” or of poor housekeeping? I say it is poor housekeeping.

We all have physical limitations. It is important these are not exceeded. Do you know your limitations? Remember, they change with age. As an example, at age 40 you need much more light to see than you did when you were 20. You may have been able to work without additional lighting several years ago, but not now. You need to adapt.

Problems are not always physical. Stresses of various types have been shown to cause an increase in illness and injury. The top five stressors are rather dramatic. They are: (1) Death of a spouse; (2) divorce; (3) marital separation; (4) sudden death of a family member and (5) a jail term. While these deal with activities away from work, work itself can introduce new stresses that could increase the likelihood of injury. Examples would include a change in supervisor, work conditions, or work hours.

So there are no stresses in your life? Let’s ask more questions. How well do you like your job? Some studies have suggested a link between injury and job satisfaction. The less you like your job or the people you work with, the more likely an injury will occur.

Do you understand your job or the instructions given? If not, this could be the problem. Do you really listen to instructions? Do you use the appropriate personal protective equipment consistently?

As you can see, there may be a number of reasons why you or your co-worker are “accident prone”. It is not inevitable. With conscious effort, behavior can be changed. Think about the reasons and make the changes necessary to end the injury cycle. There is no acceptable reason for you to be a victim time after time.

Facebook
Facebook


Website
Website



Copyright © , All rights reserved.

 


This email was sent to

Take 5 For Safety – Look Out for Co-Workers

 


Look Out for Co-Workers

Take a look around at your co-workers. Some are your friends during work hours, and even after work. You know about their families, what they like and don’t like, and what they do for fun. So, be on the lookout for unsafe conditions and correct them, or report them to your supervisors as soon as possible. Help your fellow workers get through the shift without an accident:

  • I’ll help you lift those heavy items, so you don’t have to do it by yourself. I know a back injury can mess up your home life, as well as your ability to work.
  • I’ll be sure to inspect those slings before you lift a load. I know that you are depending upon them to hold the weight of the load until it is set down.
  • I’ll inspect that ladder and make sure it is in good condition before I set it up for you to use. I will set it at a good 4:1 angle so it won’t slip while you’re on it.
  • I’ll be certain that the guardrails, mid rails and toe boards are in place before you get up on that scaffolding, because I know a fall could lead to your serious injury or death.
  • I’ll make sure that all passageways and walkways are clear so you won’t slip, trip or fall.
  • I’ll label all containers in the workplace, so you don’t use the wrong product for a job by mistake.
  • I’ll check the backup alarms on our heavy equipment, because I can’t always see you, and I want to make sure you can hear me.
  • When I’m welding, I will always set up the welding shields so the flash won’t burn your eyes.
  • I’ll tag and report all tools that aren’t working properly so you won’t be injured by plugging in a tool that has a faulty wire.
  • I’ll know and practice the emergency evacuation procedures, so we can both get out of an unsafe condition together.

Finally, I want to see you leave work exactly the way you arrived. So, if I see you doing something the wrong way, I’ll show you the right way to do it. Of course, I expect you will do the same for me-after all, shouldn’t everyone on the crew watch out for each other?

Facebook
Facebook


Website
Website



Copyright © , All rights reserved.

 


This email was sent to

Take 5 For Safety – Extension Cord Safety – Take No Chances!

 


Extension Cord Safety – Take No Chances!

We use extension cords almost every day both at work and at home. These are very useful devices, but they can present a fire or shock hazard when either worn out or used improperly.

Types of extension cords

Extension cords come in either two or three-wire types. Two-wire extension cords should only be used to operate one or two small appliances. Three-wire cords are used for outdoor appliances and electric power tools. The third wire on this cord is a ground and this type of cord should never be plugged into any ungrounded electrical outlet. Only grounded extension cords are to be used with power tools unless the tool is double insulated.

Construction sites require extension cords which are specified by the National Electric Code for hard usage or extra hard usage. Approved cords may be identified by the word “outdoor” or the letters “WA” on the jacket.

Care and inspection of extension cords

Extension cords must be treated with care and checked regularly for damage or deterioration. The cord itself should never be pulled to disconnect it from an electrical source; remove it by the plug. They should not be placed under rugs or furniture and should never be strung through doorways, windows, walls, ceilings, or floors. Damaged cords present a potential fire or shock hazard and should be destroyed and replaced immediately.

An extension cord should never be used as a substitute for permanent wiring. They should not be fastened to a building or structure, even though staples are sold for this purpose at many hardware stores. Avoid plugging two cords together to make a longer one. It’s best to use one cord in a continuous length from the receptacle to the appliance or tool. Extension cords which are either connected together or are too long will reduce operating voltage and operating efficiency of tools or appliances and may cause motor damage.

Extension cords are convenient devices which we often take for granted in our everyday activities, but which need proper care and attention. Use good housekeeping practices at home and at work, to keep extension cords from being a tripping hazards or becoming damaged. Inspect them regularly for wear and replace defective units.

Prevent potential electrical hazards that may lead to someone’s injury!

Facebook
Facebook


Website
Website



Copyright © , All rights reserved.

 


This email was sent to