Take 5 For Safety – 12 Tips For Winter Driving Part 2

 


12 Tips For Winter Driving Part 2

Driving requires all the care and caution possible any time of year. But winter driving has even greater challenges because of wet and icy road surfaces, longer hours of darkness and poor visibility because of snow, rain and fog.

Today weÂ’ will look at the last of the12 tips to help you drive more safely this winter.

7. Drive appropriately for the road conditions. The posted speed limit may be too fast under winter conditions. Driving on a wet road can cause hydroplaning as a thin barrier of water builds up between your tires and the road surface, causing your vehicle to slip. If you begin to lose control of your steering, take your foot off the gas.

8. Stay with your vehicle if it breaks down. Put on your emergency flashers and wait for assistance. Carry a sign for your window, asking other motorists to tell the police you need help.

9. Wait out bad weather. Strong icy winds in combination with snow or dust can make it impossible to see where you are driving – or walking. Under these conditions it is usually safest to stay with your vehicle and wait out the storm.

10. Plan your moves carefully. In slippery conditions, never jam on your brakes in a panic stop, you will most likely skid and lose control of the vehicle. Instead, pump your brakes gently a few times.

11. Avoid driving through deep puddles, especially at high speeds. The water can make your brakes less effective and, if deep enough, can cause serious engine damage. If you must drive through water and you are not sure about the depth, slow right down and cautiously inch forward until you are certain it is safe.

12. Quit driving when you begin to feel sleepy. If you have a long distance to drive, take frequent short breaks for fresh air and a walk around the vehicle.

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Take 5 For Safety – 12 Tips For Winter Driving Part 1

 


12 Tips For Winter Driving Part 1

Driving requires all the care and caution possible any time of year. But winter driving has even greater challenges because of wet and icy road surfaces, longer hours of darkness and poor visibility because of snow, rain and fog.

Today we will look at the first 6 of 12 tips to help you drive more safely this winter.

1. Allow enough time to get to your destination. Rushing in difficult driving conditions can lead to an accident. Turn your radio on to listen to the road report and weather forecast. Leave a few minutes earlier in the morning, and allow plenty of time to get to work. Buckle up your seat belt or safety restraint before you start driving.

2. Stay alert. Don’t drive when you are under the influence of alcohol, drugs or certain medications. Read the labels of prescription drugs and over-the-counter medicines to determine if they can cause drowsiness. Driving demands your full attention.

3. Stay calm. Sometimes other drivers will become frustrated with slow-moving traffic. Keep your temper and don’t let other drivers aggravate you. Maintain a safe speed and drive defensively.

4. Keep a safe distance between you and other vehicles. The “8-10 second rule” works well on dry roads and in ideal conditions, but in winter you should extend it to four seconds. Watch the vehicle directly ahead of you. As it passes a stationary object start counting – “one thousand and one”, “one thousand and two”, and so on. Your vehicle should not pass the same object until you say the word “four.”

5. Keep your car well-maintained and in good working order. This includes having good tread on your tires, the engine tuned-up for winter, and all lights functioning properly. In colder climates, you may need to add anti-freeze to the radiator. In some areas, gasoline antifreeze may be required.

6. Clean your windows and headlights frequently. Keep your windshield washer fluid topped up. Good visibility is essential to safe driving. Clean your windows and headlights of ice or snow before starting out, and repeat frequently throughout your trip.

Tomorrow we’ll finish up the tips.

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Take 5 For Safety – Housekeeping

 


Housekeeping

This week we’ve been looking at slips, trips and falls. One of the most important preventative things you can do for them is to have a clean work area. Housekeeping is one of the most important things we can all do to help promote a safe environment.

Over the past 5 years we’ve had a couple of recordable accidents caused by poor housekeeping. Paper laying on the floor, strapping left around, tools not put back properly, etc.

Take a look here in the cafeteria for a moment. Go ahead, take a look around. Look closely . . . do you see something someone can slip on that isn’t supposed to be there? Did someone fail to pickup after themselves? The same thing applies to the entire facility.

So as you go out to your area today, take a look around your machine. Ensure there isn’t a trip or slip hazard. If there is . . . take care of it. It’s important we all do our part to ensure we have a safe and clean working environment.

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Take 5 For Safety – Eye Protection

 


Eye Protection

The protection of your sight requires three extremes: extremely easy, extremely important, and too often, extremely forgotten. Once you have lost an eye or your ability to see, it’s too late. Protecting your eyes is the easiest thing to do, if you care about your eyes.

Guide for Discussion

Types of Eye Injuries

  • Small flying objects such as dust or other microscopic objects.
  • Particles resulting from chipping, grinding, sawing, brushing, hammering or using power tools (including nail guns).
  • Liquids such as chemicals, tar, asphalt solvents, paints or masonry cleaning solutions.
  • Invisible light rays such as those generated by welding operations or by a laser beam.

Methods of Protection

  • Safety glasses
  • Safety goggles
  • Face shields with safety glasses
  • Welding hoods

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Take 5 For Safety – PPE

 


PPE

The proper work clothing can make a job a lot easier and safer. Most workers never really think much about what they are wearing, but they should. It is very important to dress for the weather since most of the work is done outside or in areas without any climate control. A PPE assessment should have been completed prior to the job starting. Workers should be informed of what PPE is required on this specific job site.

Guide for Discussion:

The following items should help each worker how to dress properly:

Weather

  • Know the day’s forecast.
  • Be prepared to add or subtract clothing.
  • Never work without your shirt in summer.

If you begin to overheat, don’t take off more clothes. Instead, slow down your working pace.

  • In winter, try to avoid getting wet by wearing the proper clothing.

Proper Clothing – Head to Toe

  • A Hard Hat when required; soft cap during winter months.
  • Eye protection of either safety glasses or safety goggles.
  • Face shield for face protection.
  • Long or short sleeved shirt depending on the weather.
  • Long pants always – wearing short pants can be dangerous if you are light skinned.
  • Thick socks.
  • Safety shoes, steel or composite toes if required.
  • Work gloves.

Watch for the Following

  • Dirty clothes – keep your clothes clean and free of grime and bacteria.
  • Keep oil and chemicals off of your clothes—don’t be a human torch.
  • Don’t wear pants with cuffs on them.
  • Missing buttons, rips and tears can increase the chances of cuts, bruises and other injuries.
  • Loose garments tend to get caught easily; Belts, ties and other accessories.

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Take 5 For Safety – Guardrails

 


Guardrails

One of the more common OSHA citations is for lack of or improperly erected guardrails. There are two basic types of guardrails – the perimeter guardrail (i.e., found on flat roofs, upper stories before framing walls) and floor opening guardrails. Both are constructed the same way and are designed to provide the same type of protection.

Guide for Discussion

The following items should be reviewed when discussing guardrails:
When are they required?

  • All open-sided floors or floor openings exposing workers to a fall of six feet or greater (Four feet – general industry).

Standard Specifications

  • The top rail should be 42†high and constructed of 2â€x4†stock wood.
  • The intermediate (or mid rail) should be 21†(also using 2â€x4â€).
  • The bottom rail or toeboard should be at least 4†in vertical height from the floor to the top of the toeboard.
  • Uprights will be 2â€x4†at 8’ centers at a minimum.
  • All components must withstand a load test of 200 pounds at any point.

General Rules

  • Install guardrails properly the first time and reduce the amount of maintenance.
  • Install as you go—don’t wait and then have to catch up.
  • Regularly inspect all rails.

Remember: Guardrails are designed to protect you from falling from one level to another. If the guardrail is defective or not there at all, then you are exposed to serious injury or even death.

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Take 5 For Safety – Ladder Safety

 


Ladder Safety

Injuries in the workplace because of ladder are commonplace. Falls from ladders can be as painful as a fall from a roof; about a third of all reported falls are falls from ladders. Many of the fall related injuries result from the improper use or the use of a defective ladder. Step/extension ladders are made to access/egress upper levels, not to be used as work platforms. There are specifically designed ladders for use as work platforms such as order pickers. These ladders are constructed with a small platform and guardrail. The following safe work rules should be observed when working with ladders.

Guide for Discussion

Inspection

  • Look for missing or loose cleats at the bottom.
  • Look for loose or missing screws, bolts or nails on job made ladders
  • Look for cracked, broken, split, dented or badly worn rungs, cleats or side rails.
  • Splinters on wood ladders.
  • Corrosion on metal ladders.

Ladder Use

  • Always use the right ladder for the right job.
  • Don’t set your ladder in a walkway or door opening.
  • Keep the area at the top and bottom of the ladder clear of tool cords, tools, material and garbage.
  • Always set the ladder on solid footing.
  • Use a twenty-five percent (4:1) angle on the slope of the ladder.
  • When using extension ladders, the three (3) top rungs must extend beyond the landing platform. (Or the top of an extension ladder must be 36†(3 feet) above the landing.
  • Don’t lean to the side when on a ladder or you may tip over.
  • Do not carry tools or materials on a ladder. Use both hands when climbing a ladder to grab onto the side rails. If it is necessary to move material or tools up a ladder, first climb up, then pull up the work with a hand line.
  • Only one person on a ladder at a time (unless the ladder is double cleated).
  • Always secure the top of the ladder to prevent it from sliding.
  • Never lean a step ladder; always fully open a step ladder.
  • Always face the ladder.

Additional Discussion Notes:

Always tie off the ladder. That way it stays where you put it.

Remember: When you are on a ladder, you can fall. If you can fall, you can get hurt. Use ladders safely.

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Take 5 For Safety – Electrical Hazards

 


Electrical Hazards

Electrical hazards are doubly hazardous in that there is not only the chance of electrocution, but there is also the probability that any electric shock will cause a loss of consciousness that may well result in a fall of some sort. Today we will discuss methods of receiving an electric shock and ways to avoid electrical hazards.

Guide for Discussion

Methods of Receiving an Electric Shock

  • From a defective power tool.
  • From defective extension cords.
  • From overloading a switch or over-riding a by-pass.
  • By not grounding electrical equipment or using Ground Fault Circuit Interrupters.
  • By coming in close contact with live electric lines.
  • By coming too close to high power lines with the power arcing over and making contact.

Ways to Avoid Electric Hazards

  • Use Ground Fault Interrupters (GFCI’s) on all jobsites.
  • Always inspect tools and equipment for frayed cords and defective plugs before using them.
  • Never use a power tool that has had the ground plug removed; inspect the plug.
  • Never stand in water and operate a power tool without proper (i.e., insulated) footwear.
  • Keep extension cords out of water when in use.
  • Consider all power lines “live†and avoid contact with them.
  • Follow the company assured grounding/electrical protection program.
  • Disconnect all electrical tools and cords when not in use.
  • Be use all temporary lighting is equipped with bulb covers.
  • Make sure all power supplies, circuit boxes and breaker boxes are properly marked to indicate their purpose.

Remember: The best way to eliminate the hazard of the “quiet killer†is to act as if each exposure to an electrical hazard may be your last. Never take electricity for granted, “it’s a killer.â€

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Take 5 For Safety – Proper Lifting

 


Proper Lifting

Introduction: Most of us forget the importance of our backs for the enjoyment of a normal, happy and successful life. However, the back contains one of the most critical muscle groups in the body, as well as the spinal cord and associated vertebrae and discs. Everyone working in the building industry must lift materials to either put them into place or to expedite from one location to another. Back injuries are cumulative; a lot of small injuries lead up to the big one. Therefore, it is important to remember the key elements of proper lifting.

Guide for Discussion

Preparing to Lift

  • Do you need help? Get help if needed (more people, lift equipment).
  • Do you need to stretch before preparing to lift?
  • Determine the load capacity.
  • Determine your ability to handle the load.
  • Wear safe shoes.
  • Wear gloves to protect your hands if the surface is rough.
  • Make sure you have a clear walkway.

Making the Lift

  • Center the load between your legs or shoulders
  • Always bend with your legs
  • Keep your back straight
  • Lift with your legs (You can feel your leg muscles doing the work)
  • Keep the load close to your body. (Hug the object you are lifting.

Moving the Load

  • Keep your back as vertical as possible.
  • Keep the load close to you.
  • Don’t twist your body – move your feet.
  • When lowering your load, bend with the knees and keep the back straight.
  • Remember to follow these rules of lifting and you will give your back a break rather than breaking your back.

Additional Discussion Notes:

Remember: The only thing you’ll prove by lifting more than you should is that your back is a poor substitute for a forklift. Think before you lift—every time.

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Take 5 For Safety – Compressed Air Hose Safety

 


Compressed Air Hose Safety

Compressed air is a very useful thing however it can be dangerous and must be used in a safe manner. Here are some tips when using a compressed air.

General Use

  • Keep air hose off the floor where it is a trip hazard and subject to damage by trucks, doors, and dropped tools. During a recent audit of our facility we found many unused air hoses laying across the floor, many attached to a self-retracting reel.
  • Prevent sharp objects from rubbing against the hose. Be especially careful if the hose gets wedged in a corner or hung around a machine. Always go to the point where the hose is stuck and guide it. Don’t pull on the hose trying to free it.
  • Prior to use, ensure the quick-connect is properly seated and there is no apparent damage to the hose or fittings. Weak points may swell like a balloon and burst, throwing pieces of hose in every direction. This may also cause the hose to thrash about dangerously.
  • If your area doesn’t have a self-retracting reel, always coil the hose—without kinks—and hang it over a broad support, not over a hook, nail, or angle iron, when not in use.

When using it to blow dust and debris:

  • Ensure you are wearing goggles or a face shield to protect your face and eyes. Air in excess of 30 lbs. can blow an eye from its socket, and/or rupture an eardrum.
  • Always utilize a OSHA approved air nozzle that reduces our 90 lb. air down to a safe level for such use.
  • Never aim the hose at yourself or someone else.
  • Never use compressed air to clean off your body. Air pressure against the skin may penetrate deeply to cause internal hemorrhage and intense pain.
  • Keep air hose off the floor where it is a trip hazard and subject to damage by trucks, doors, and dropped tools.

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